Full meaning African Union Community of Sahel–Saharan States Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa Economic Community of West African States Investimento direto estrangeiro Produto interno bruto Inclining block tariff(s) International Monetary Fund Independent power producer Kilowatt Kilowatt hour Gás de petróleo líquido Megawatt Pay as you go Power purchase agreement Private public partnership Standard and Poors Global Ratings Sub-Saharan Africa Transmissão e Distribuição Time of use West African Economic and Monetary Union United Nations Industrial Development Organization Value added tax World Bank Regulatory Indicators for Sustainable Energy Projecção para 2030 2017/2018 ano do relatório A média SSA inclui a África do Sul. Cálculo para a média da ASS e dados do país: Consumo total (2016) / população total (2016). Média Àfrica subsariana : 18% Isto inclui os subsídios ao gasóleo, querosene e gasolina. As taxas e tarifas foram convertidas com a taxa de câmbio média para o Euro em Abril de 2020. Taxas de câmbio disponíveis em ec.europa.eu As taxas e tarifas foram convertidas com a taxa de câmbio média para o Euro em Abril de 2020. Taxas de câmbio disponíveis em ec.europa.eu As taxas e tarifas foram convertidas com a taxa de câmbio média para o Euro em Abril de 2020. Taxas de câmbio disponíveis em ec.europa.eu

Sector energético

Visão Geral do Investimento
Senegal had an installed capacity of more than 1,100 MW in 2018 with an average power plant availability of 89%. This equated to an average operational capacity of 1,005 MW, exceeding the country’s peak demand by about 357 MW in the same year. Almost 13% of the national installed capacity is solar.

Electrification rates are relatively high for the region, with a national access rate of almost 70% and rural electricity access just below 50%. Consumption of electricity across user types is balanced, with industrial and residential sectors consuming marginally more than commercial users. Per capita consumption lags behind the sub-Saharan Africa average, but remains higher than many other economies in the region.

The government is targeting universal electrification by 2025, and expects peak demand to double to around 1,350 MW by then. Meanwhile targets are in place to increase the country’s installed capacity to 2,500 MW by 2030 to help meet the increasing demand.

Senegal has been a leader in energy sector reform in the region, as one of the first countries to open its sector to private participation. While the national utility operates a monopoly on grid transmission and distribution, private sector generation accounts for about 40% of the country’s installed capacity and is steadily increasing as a portion of market share. Energy policy is generally favourable to private participation and regulation is in place to ensure a competitive market for electricity.

Senegal boasts an impressive portfolio of renewable energy projects, some of which are the largest of their kind in West Africa. In January of 2018, Senegal inaugurated the second of its twin landmark solar power projects, Senergy and Ten Merina, each of which has a generating capacity of 30 MW. In February of 2020 Senegal inaugurated a 158 MW wind farm in Taiba Ndiaye. Currently in its first phase, the flagship plant is generating 50 MW and once fully operational it will increase the country’s capacity by around 15%.

Estrutura

Senegal was one of the first countries in sub-Saharan Africa to open its energy sector to private participation. The governing policy for the energy sector is the Letter of Policy Development of the Energy Sector (Lettre de Politique de Développement du Secteur de l’Energie, LPDSE), the most recent version of which plans for the period 2019-2023. This document outlines several key objectives explicitly aimed at increased private sector participation in the sector, including encouraging independent generation, and institutional reform, improving competitiveness and strengthening regulation.

Under Senagalese law, generation and isolated distribution of electricity is allowed by the private sector and is regulated accordingly to ensure fair competition. With the exception of the national utility, the holder of a distribution concession is not permitted to own shares in a generation concession, and vice versa. Sale of electricity is subject to a licence from the Minister of Energy which specifies territorial scope, duration, public service obligations and type and consumption of serviceable customers.

Apart from the national utility, Société National d’Électricité du Sénégal (SENELEC) (National Electricity Company of Senegal), the country’s energy market is composed of private industrial units and IPPs. IPPs account for about half the national generation capacity and are required to supply all electricity to SENELEC as the sole buyer and seller of wholesale electricity to the grid. Senegal’s first IPP was a 52 MW thermal plant commissioned in 2000, followed by a second plant in 2008. IPPs have had a mixed track record in the country due to grid instability, fuel quality and other technical challenges.
Generation:

Société National d’Électricité du Sénégal (SENELEC) (National Electricity Company of Senegal) had an installed capacity in 2018 that amounted to 52% of total capacity, followed by 39% in the case of IPPs. In 2018, 9% of all electricity consumed was imported.

Transmission:

SENELEC holds a monopoly on the transmission of electricity in the country.

Distribution:

SENELEC holds a monopoly on the distribution of electricity in the country.
Société National d’Électricité du Sénégal (SENELEC) (National Electricity Company of Senegal) is the national state-owned electricity utility. It holds a monopoly on the transmission and distribution of electricity. The utility also owns about half of the generation capacity. The utility has been through several phases of privatisation.

Agence Sénégalaise d’Électrification Rurale (ASER) (Rural Electrification Agency) is responsible for Senegal's rural electrification and manages relevant programmes such as the Rural Electrification Priority Programme (PPER) and the Local Rural Electrification Initiative (ERIL). It builds projects and also procures EPC services.
Ministère du Pétrole et des Énergies (Ministry of Petroleum and Energy) (formerly Ministry of Energy and Renewable Energy Development) is the responsible entity of the entire energy sector, leading the development and implementation of policies and strategies.
Commission de Régulation du Secteur de l’Électricité (CRSE) (Regulatory Commission for the Electricity Sector) has the role of promoting competition, efficiency and economy in bulk power markets, as well as protecting consumers through regulating electricity tariffs and improving the quality of supply.
Agence Nationale pour les Énergies Renouvelables (ANER) (National Agency for Renewable Energy) has been created to support the promotion and development of alternative energy in all forms: solar, wind, biomass, tidal and small hydro. They have developed the concept for a renewable energy cluster in Senegal to gather all the renewable energy actors in Senegal. ANER will soon be integrated into SENELEC.

Promotion des Investissements et Grands Travaux (APIX) (Investment Promotion and Major Works Agency) is a private company, of which the state of Senegal is the main shareholder. Its main objective is to promote investment in Senegal, both from local and international companies. APIX provides support for all administrative procedures needed to establish a company in Senegal as well as to apply for the different benefits provided by the government for the establishment of new companies in Senegal. APIX helps, as well, in the research and identification of local partners.

Conseil Patronal des Énergies Renouvelables du Sénégal (COPERES) (Business Council of Renewable Energies in Senegal) is involved with renewable energy advocacy (primarily on-grid).

Actores-chave

Mapa da rede de abastecimento
Transmissão (OMS)
Distribuição (prevista)
Objectivos de electrificação
Utilidade/distribuidor
Société National d’Électricité du Sénégal (SENELEC) (National Electricity Company of Senegal) is the national state-owned electricity utility. It holds a monopoly on the transmission and distribution of electricity. The utility also owns about half of the generation capacity. The utility has been through several phases of privatisation.

Agence Sénégalaise d’Électrification Rurale (ASER) (Rural Electrification Agency) is responsible for Senegal's rural electrification and manages relevant programmes such as the Rural Electrification Priority Programme (PPER) and the Local Rural Electrification Initiative (ERIL). It builds projects and also procures EPC services.
Ministério (Ministérios)
Ministère du Pétrole et des Énergies (Ministry of Petroleum and Energy) (formerly Ministry of Energy and Renewable Energy Development) is the responsible entity of the entire energy sector, leading the development and implementation of policies and strategies.
Regulador
Commission de Régulation du Secteur de l’Électricité (CRSE) (Regulatory Commission for the Electricity Sector) has the role of promoting competition, efficiency and economy in bulk power markets, as well as protecting consumers through regulating electricity tariffs and improving the quality of supply.
Outros
Agence Nationale pour les Énergies Renouvelables (ANER) (National Agency for Renewable Energy) has been created to support the promotion and development of alternative energy in all forms: solar, wind, biomass, tidal and small hydro. They have developed the concept for a renewable energy cluster in Senegal to gather all the renewable energy actors in Senegal. ANER will soon be integrated into SENELEC.

Promotion des Investissements et Grands Travaux (APIX) (Investment Promotion and Major Works Agency) is a private company, of which the state of Senegal is the main shareholder. Its main objective is to promote investment in Senegal, both from local and international companies. APIX provides support for all administrative procedures needed to establish a company in Senegal as well as to apply for the different benefits provided by the government for the establishment of new companies in Senegal. APIX helps, as well, in the research and identification of local partners.

Conseil Patronal des Énergies Renouvelables du Sénégal (COPERES) (Business Council of Renewable Energies in Senegal) is involved with renewable energy advocacy (primarily on-grid).

Tarifas

Componentes tarifários
Baixa voltagem
Consumption Charge (€/ kWh):
€0.20
Fixed Charge (€/ kW/month):
Residential large power: €1.45
Commercial large power: €2.84
Public lighting: €5.03
VAT (%):
18%. Included in consumption charges and fixed charges
Communal Tax (%):
Varies depending on area
Tensão média
Consumption Charge (€/ kWh):
€0.18
Fixed Charge (€/ kW/month):
Short use: €1.46
General: €6.22
Long use: €15.02
VAT (%):
18%. Included in consumption charges and fixed charges
Communal Tax (%):
Varies depending on area
Alta tensão
Consumption Charge (€/ kWh):





€0.13
Fixed Charge (€/ kW/month):
General: €15.24
Emergency: €6.78
VAT (%):
18%. Included in consumption charges and fixed charges
Communal Tax (%):
Varies depending on area
Tarifa média de venda a retalho por categoria de consumo
Baixa voltagem (c/ kWh)
Average LV
19.7
Residential Small Power (average of IBTs)\n
16.6
Residential Small Power Prepaid (average of IBTs)\n
16
Residential Medium Power (average of IBTs)\n
16.9
Residential Medium Power Prepaid
16.4
Residential Large Power (average of peak and offpeak)
17.4
Commercial Small Power (average of IBTs)
23.1
Commercial Small Power Prepaid (average of IBTs)
22.4
Commercial Medium Power (average of IBTs)
23.3
Commercial Medium Power Prepaid (average of IBTs)
22.6
Commercial Large Power (average of peak and offpeak)
22.5
Public Lighting
19.8
Média voltagem (c/ kWh)
Average MV
17.9
Short Use (average of peak and offpeak)
24.3
General (average of peak and offpeak)
17.9
Long Use (average of peak and offpeak)
14.7
Rural Electrification Concession
14.7
Alta voltagem (c/ kWh)
Average HV
12.8
General (average of peak and off-peak)
10.9
Emergency (average of peak and off-peak)
14.6
A tarifa da electricidade a retalho está sujeita a revisão periódica?
No
The Ministry of Energy and the Commission de Régulation du Secteur de l’Electricité (CRSE) allow concession holders to charge tariffs at or below a capped price. This price is set at a level the CRSE consider sufficient to allow the concession holder to obtain a suitable rate of return.

Senegal is in the midst of a tariff harmonization process that will bring all electricity tariffs in the country in-line with those charged by Senelec the national electricity company of Senegal.

Normas de qualidade

Association Sénégalaise de Normalisation (ASN) (Standards Association of Senegal) develops and promotes national and international standards in Senegal. Relevant categories of standards include electrotechnical and solar energy. Applicable standards include NS 13-001 (Photovoltaic terrestrial systems), NS 13-002 (Measurement of photovoltaic solar modules), NS 13-003 (Measurement of current-voltage characteristics) and NS 13-004 (Stationary lead-acid batteries).

Explorar os dados

Taxa de electrificação
% Taxa de electrificação nacional
2018
% Taxa de electrificação rural
2018
% Taxa de electrificação urbana
2018
Capacidade total instalada (MW)
2030
2,500
2018
1,130
Pico de procura (MW)
2025
1356
2018
648
Electricity consumption by sector (MWh), 2017
Commercial & Public Services
1011.81
Residential
1151.37
Industrial
1151.37
Consumo de electricidade per capita (kWh/pessoa)
2016
233.23
SSA average (2016)
365.6
Potencial de recursos solares fotovoltaicos (faixa de saída, kWh/kWp)
4.4 - 4.8
Potencial de recursos eólicos (gama de velocidade do vento, metro por segundo)
3.0 - 8.0
Recurso Potencial (pequena central hidroeléctrica) MW
160.1
Combinação de electricidade por fonte (% da capacidade instalada), 2018
Solar (12.65 %)
Outros (87.35 %)
Preço do gasóleo por litro (EUR)
Perdas técnicas em Transmissão e Distribuição (% da geração)
2018
15.10%
Subsídios à electricidade e aos produtos petrolíferos (% do PIB)
Subsídios para a electricidade, 2017
3.46%
€643,181,100.00
Subsídios aos produtos petrolíferos , 2017
0.00%
IMF reports $0.00 in billions of dollars. Most likely the subsidy amount in Senegal is too small to be considered on this scale.
Metodologia
Saiba como estes Country Briefs foram desenvolvidos
Leia mais
Contacto
Perguntas ou comentários são sempre bem-vindos
info@get-invest.eu