GET.invest

Fermer
Meilleurs résultats
Voir tous les résultats
Full meaning Union africaine Communauté des États sahélo-sahariens Marché commun de l'Afrique orientale et australe Communauté économique des États de l'Afrique de l'Ouest Les investissements directs étrangers Produit intérieur brut Tarifs par tranches Fonds monétaire international Petits producteurs d'énergie indépendants Kilowatt Kilowatt heure Gaz de pétrole liquide Megawatt Pay as you go Contrat d'achat d'électricité Partenariats public-privé Standard and Poors Global Ratings Afrique subsaharienne Transmission et distribution Time of use Union économique et monétaire ouest-africaine United Nations Industrial Development Organization Taxe Sur La Valeur Ajoutee Indicateurs réglementaires de la Banque mondiale pour l'énergie durable Projection pour 2030 2017/2018 année de référence La moyenne des pays d'Afrique sub-saharienne inclut l'Afrique du Sud. Calcul pour les données de moyenne et de pays de l'Afrique sub-saharienne : Consommation totale (2016) / population totale (2016). Moyenne de l’Afrique subsaharienne: 18% Cela comprend les subventions au diesel, au kérosène et à l'essence. Les taux et les tarifs ont été convertis avec le taux de change moyen en euros en avril 2020. Taux de change disponibles depuis ec.europa.eu Les taux et les tarifs ont été convertis avec le taux de change moyen en euros en avril 2020. Taux de change disponibles depuis ec.europa.eu Les taux et les tarifs ont été convertis avec le taux de change moyen en euros en avril 2020. Taux de change disponibles depuis ec.europa.eu

Secteur de l'énergie

Aperçu de l'investissement
Namibia’s heavy reliance on hydropower, coupled with a severe drought in 2019, meant that the country’s total installed capacity was only operating at an average of 40%. To meet demand, the country is reliant on imports. The national electrification rate is almost 60%, which is significant considering how sparsely populated the country is. The small population also results in high per capita electricity consumption, amounting to 1,650 kWh annually, more than four times the sub-Saharan Africa average.

NamPower tariffs are below €0.10/kWh even for low-voltage consumers, which compare well to other economies in the region. Average transmission and distribution technical losses across the various T&D companies are exceptionally low at half the sub-Saharan Africa average, amounting to about 9.1% of generation.

Peak demand is expected to increase by more than 40% between 2018 and 2025 to around 930 MW. Some portion of this is likely to be driven by efforts to electrify the quarter of a million households currently without electricity. Installed capacity is expected to grow to 1,138 MW by 2030.

Namibia’s energy sector has had limited private sector participation in the past and has been characteristically state-owned. Recent reforms and restructuring efforts, however, are creating an increasingly attractive private operating environment and subsequent investment opportunities. Private sector participation is allowed across generation, transmission and distribution components of the electricity supply sector, although NamPower still has a monopoly on electricity transmission. Direct transactions between IPPs and local distributors are also allowed, albeit subject to specific conditions and limitations. After concluding several PPAs in 2019, the country’s energy sector is rapidly growing its ability to engage the private sector.

NamPower continues to procure more capacity from IPPs. In 2019, it announced a 20 MW solar project that will be tendered to an IPP. This forms part of the entity’s 2019 - 2023 plan to add several new plants to the country’s capacity, many of which will be developed by IPPs and the national Renewable Energy Feed In Tariff (REFIT) programme. Several REFIT projects were inaugurated in 2019 and 11 are already operating by the end of the year.

Structure

Namibia’s energy sector has historically been characterised by a distinct lack of private sector participation. More recently, the sector has undertaken several reforms to attract IPPs and create a favourable investment environment. Key actions include establishing a transparent tariff-setting process and the horizontal consolidation of more than 70 distributors into five regional electricity distribution companies (REDs), all of which is overseen by the sector regulator. REDs are predominantly owned by the state, however private sector ownership is allowed and does occur, usually by mines and farmer cooperatives.

In 2019, the country’s cabinet approved a modified version of its current single buyer model. A key feature of the updated model is that it allows for IPPs and transmission customers, which comprise large mines, REDs and other supply points connected directly to the transmission grid, to transact directly for the supply of electricity. This means transmission customers will be able to buy up to 30% of their energy directly from private generators without the need for an intermediary.

By the end of 2019, NamPower and REDs have signed 26 PPAs with IPPs. 14 of these are small IPPs from the Renewable Energy Feed in Tariff (REFIT) programme, expected to invest a total of around €100 million in the sector.
Generation:

NamPower, the vertically integrated state-owned utility, operates the majority of generation infrastructure. By the end of 2019, this amounted to about 70% of installed capacity. IPPs were operating about 22% of total installed capacity, while captive power plants were responsible for approximately 8% of total installed capacity.

Transmission:

NamPower has a monopoly in transmission. In 2018, its transmission network covered 11,673 km.

Distribution:

NamPower is involved with electricity distribution, alongside three regional distribution companies and local authorities. NamPower's distribution grids stretched 22,390 km by the end of 2018. Regional distribution companies include NORED, CENORED and Erongo RED. Two additional distribution companies have been proposed. Local authorities, for example the City of Windhoek, are also tasked with last-mile distribution.
NamPower is the national state-owned utility in charge of generation and transmission. The utility reports to the Ministry of Mines and Energy and is regulated by the Electricity Control Board.

Regional Electricity Distributors (REDs) include Northern Regional Electricity Distribution (NORED), Erongo Regional Electricity Distribution (Erongored) and CENORED. Proposed distributors include Central RED and Southern RED. The REDs are predominantly state-owned.
The Electricity Division of the Ministry of Mines and Energy is engaged in coordinating, planning, managing project financing and implementing national electricity programmes with emphasis on rural electrification programmes and power generation projects. It also monitors the electricity supply industry (ESI) restructuring through policy formulation and implementation.
The Electricity Control Board (ECB) is a statutory regulatory authority established in 2000. Among its main responsibilities are the regulation of most aspects of the electricity sector, such as tariff setting and the issuing of licences.
The Renewable Energy Industry Association of Namibia is an advocacy organisation for renewable energy in Namibia.

Acteurs clés

Carte de localisation de réseaux
Transmission (OSIM)
Distribution (prévue)
Objectifs en matière d'électricité
Utilitaire/distributeur
NamPower is the national state-owned utility in charge of generation and transmission. The utility reports to the Ministry of Mines and Energy and is regulated by the Electricity Control Board.

Regional Electricity Distributors (REDs) include Northern Regional Electricity Distribution (NORED), Erongo Regional Electricity Distribution (Erongored) and CENORED. Proposed distributors include Central RED and Southern RED. The REDs are predominantly state-owned.
Ministère (ministères)
The Electricity Division of the Ministry of Mines and Energy is engaged in coordinating, planning, managing project financing and implementing national electricity programmes with emphasis on rural electrification programmes and power generation projects. It also monitors the electricity supply industry (ESI) restructuring through policy formulation and implementation.
Régulateur
The Electricity Control Board (ECB) is a statutory regulatory authority established in 2000. Among its main responsibilities are the regulation of most aspects of the electricity sector, such as tariff setting and the issuing of licences.
Autres
The Renewable Energy Industry Association of Namibia is an advocacy organisation for renewable energy in Namibia.

Tarifs

Composants tarifaires
Basse tension
Consumption Charge (€/ kWh):
€0.09

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Basic Capacity Charge (€/amp/month):
Residential: €0.28
Basic commercial: €0.28

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Reserved Capacity Charge (€/amp/month):
Other LV small power users: €43.80 (average across amp rating categories)
Other LV large power users: €0.28

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Service Charge (€/month):
Other LV small power users: €27.42
Other LV large power users: €68.48

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Demand Charge (€/kW/month):
Other LV large power users: €13.53

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Demand Charge (€/kVA/month):
Other LV large power users: €12.37

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
ECB Levy (€/kWh):
Variable, included in consumption charge
NEF Levy (€/ kWh)
Variable, included in consumption charge
Tax (%):
15% VAT, included in consumption charge and other charges
Tension moyenne
Consumption Charge (€/ kWh):
€0.07

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Demand Charge (€/ kW/month):
Non-TOU: €11.54

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Demand Charge (€/kVA/month):
Non-TOU: €10.53
TOU (<33kV): €5.18

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Service Charge (€/month):
Non-TOU: €55.35
TOU (<33kV): €519.57

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Point of Supply Charge (€/month):
TOU (<33kV) (<10MVA): €250.92
TOU (<33kV) (>10MVA): €340.64

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Network Access Charge (€/kVA/month):
TOU (<33kV): €4.82

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
ECB Levy (€/ kWh):
Variable, included in consumption charge

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
NEF Levy (€/ kWh)
Variable, included in consumption charge

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Tax (%):
15% VAT, included in consumption charge

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Haute tension
Consumption Charge (€/ kWh):







€0.07

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Demand Charge (€/kVA/month):
TOU (>33 kV): €4.98

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Service Charge (€/month):
TOU (>33 kV): €519.57

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Point of Supply charge (€/month):
TOU (>33 kV) (<10 MVA): €250.92
TOU (>33 kV) (>10 MVA): €340.64

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Network Access Charge (€/kVA/month):
TOU (>33 kV): €4.64

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Tax (%):
15% VAT, included in consumption charge

Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020.
Note that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Tarif de détail moyen par catégorie de consommation
Basse tension (c€/kWh)
Average LV
9
Residential (average across categories)\n
9.2
Commercial (average across categories)
9.7
Water Pumping (average across categories)
8.7
Other LV (average across categories)
8.7
Note
Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020. \n\nNote that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Tension moyenne (€c/kWh)
Average MV
6.5
Commercial Non-TOU
5.9
Miscellaneous Non-TOU
5.9
TOU (<33kV; average of peak, standard and off-peak; high demand season)
8.1
TOU (<33kV; average of peak, standard and off-peak; low demand season)
5.7
TOU (<33kV; average of peak, standard and off-peak; single season)
6.3
Note
Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020. \n\nNote that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Haute tension (c€/kWh)
Average HV
6.6
TOU (>33kV; high demand season; average of peak, standard and off-peak)
8
TOU (>33kV; low demand season; average of peak, standard and off-peak)
5.6
TOU (>33kV; single season; average of peak, standard and off-peak)
6.1
Note
Tariffs will remain the same for 2020/2021 based on a decision by the Electricity Control Board in April 2020. \n\nNote that these are NAMPower tariffs.
Le tarif de détail de l'électricité fait-il l'objet d'un réexamen périodique?
Yes
The Board of Directors of the Electricity Control Board (ECB) meet annually to review the tariff application of NamPower the national power utility. The reviews are conducted to “to ensure that utilities charge appropriate tariffs to collect sufficient revenue to enable reliable and efficient operations at affordable rates.” After a tariff reduction in 2019, the tariffs we increased by 3.9% for the 2020/2021 cycle.

Normes de qualité

The ECB regulates quality standards in the electricity supply industry through the 2004 Quality of Service Standards and the 2004 Quality of Supply Standards. Namibia Standards Institution (NSI) is the national standards body of Namibia. The institution is responsible for developing quality standards and enhancing product quality, industrial efficiency and productivity in Namibia. Relevant NSI standards include NAMS/IEC/TS 62257 (Recommendations for small renewable energy and hybrid systems for rural electrification), NAMS/NRS 052-1:2013 (Photovoltaic systems for use in individual homes) and NAMS/IEC 61215-1 (Terrestrial photovoltaic modules). NSI does not have any clean cooking standards in place as per the latest standards catalogue.

Explorer les données

Taux d'électrification
% Taux d'électrification national
2018
% Taux d'électrification rural
2018
% Taux d'électrification urbain
2018
Puissance installée totale (MW)
2030
1,138
2018
590.23
Demande de pointe (MW)
2025
931
2018
647
Electricity consumption by sector (MWh), 2017
Services commerciaux et publics
0
Résidentiel
0
Industriel
604.76
Consommation d'électricité par habitant (kWh/personne)
2016
1650.1
SSA average (2016)
365.6
Potentiel des ressources photovoltaïques (plage de sortie, kWh/kWp)
4.9 - 5.8
Potentiel des ressources éoliennes (plage de vitesse du vent, mètre par seconde)
2.5 - 9.5
Potentiel des ressources (petite centrale hydroélectrique) MW
1685.1
Mélange d'électricité par source (% de la capacité installée)
Solaire (13.03 %)
Autres (86.97 %)
Prix du diesel par litre (EUROS)
Pertes techniques T&D (% de la production)
2018
9.06%
Subventions pour l'électricité et les produits pétroliers (% du PIB)
Subventions à l'électricité, 2017
0.74%
€88,107,000.00
Subventions aux produits pétroliers, 2017
1.03%
€123,349,800.00
Méthodologie
Apprenez à savoir comment les mémoires sur les pays ont été développée
En savoir plus
Contact
Les questions ou les commentaires sont toujours les bienvenus
info@get-invest.eu